(NORWEGIAN) BLACK METAL



One Man Metal - Black Metal's Unexplored Fringes




For this new, three-part documentary, we interviewed Leviathan, Striborg, and Xasthur, three solo artists who produce Black Metal on the margins of society. 








(NORWEGIAN) BLACK METAL

The darkest metal of all: black metal, which emerged 

in Norway in the early nineties




Black metal, or “TNBM — True Norwegian Black Metal,” as the country calls it, developed as a genre in its own right in the early 1990s with bands like Mayhem, Darkthrone, Burzum, Immortal and Emperor.

Its hallmarks include shrieked vocals, highly distorted guitars, blast-beat drumming and very fast tempos.


Gorgoroth is a Norwegian black metal band based in Bergen. Formed in 1992 by Infernus (who is also the only original member remaining), the band is named after the dead plateau of evil and darkness in the land of Mordor from J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings.

The group is currently signed to Regain Recordsand have released eight full-length studio albums. A re-recording of their third album, Under the Sign of Hell, was released in 2011, and a new full-length album has been in the works since late 2009.

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PETER BESTE : True Norwegian Black Metal


Over a period of six years, the photographer Peter Beste documented the secretive, insular community of black-metal musicians and fans, with a focus on the bands Darkthrone, Mayhem, Emperor, Enslaved, Gorgoroth, Carpathian Forest, as well as several lesser-known acts. “Black metal in Norway is unlike any other musical scene I have ever witnessed,” syas. 


“It’s heavily influenced by ancient Norse religions, and a common theme is a disdain for Christianity and a desire to revert to the ancient pagan ways.” In his book on black metal, Beste describes the genre as an isolationist movement, and notes that this “same subculture that initially embraced obscurity, solitude, and its inherent marginality instead has reverberated around the world, trickling into the mainstream as Norway’s largest musical export.”







I met Metalion during a drunken night at Oslo’s Inferno Festival in 2003. I was impressed by his kind nature and unparalleled knowledge of extreme metal, so we stayed in touch over the next few years, occasionally geeking out over cameras and records. My friend Johan Kugelberg, the essential editorial force behind my new book of photos documenting the black-metal scene (True Norwegian Black Metal, published by Vice Books), was also in touch with Metalion and suggested bringing him in to help put together the book.

In 1985, Metalion started Slayer, which would become Norway’s most influential and essential metal fanzine. Metalion is kind of like the Virgil of black metal. He was there for all the notorious events, and his first-person understanding is reflected in his brilliant fanzine. There is no better authority on this often misunderstood and misreported genre.

What follows is Metalion’s primer on the unholy history of Norwegian black metal. —PETER BESTE



MORE HERE
http://www.vice.com/read/saga-true-black-metal-v15n5



TRUE NORWEGIAN BLACK METAL FROM VICE





Until The Light Takes Us

http://www.blackmetalmovie.com/

Until The Light Takes Us tells the story of black metal. Part music scene and part cultural uprising, black metal rose to worldwide notoriety in the mid-nineties when a rash of suicides, murders, and church burnings accompanied the explosive artistic growth and output of a music scene that would forever redefine what heavy metal is and what it stands for to other musicians, artists and music fans world-wide. Until The Light Takes Us goes behind the highly sensationalized media reports of "Satanists running amok in Europe" to examine the complex and largely misunderstood principles and beliefs that led to this rebellion against both Christianity and modern culture.


To capture this on film, directors Aaron Aites and Audrey Ewell moved to Norway and lived with the musicians for several years, building relationships that allowed them to create a surprisingly intimate portrait of this violent, but ultimately misunderstood, movement. The result is a poignant, moving story thats as much about the idea that reality is composed of whatever the most people believe, regardless of whats actually true, as it is about a music scene that blazed a path of murder and arson across the northern sky




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