PHOTOGRAPHY




> FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHY



PHOTOGRAPHY OF EIKOH HOSOE



Eikoh Hosoe (細江 英公 Hosoe Eikō?, born 18 March 1933 in Yonezawa, Yamagata)[1] is a Japanese photographer and filmmaker who emerged in the experimental arts movement of post-World War II Japan. He is known for his psychologically charged images, often exploring subjects such as death, erotic obsession, and irrationality. Through his friendships and artistic collaborations he is linked with the writer Yukio Mishima and 1960s avant-garde artists such as the dancer Tatsumi Hijikata.


“To me photography can be simultaneously both a record and a mirror or window of self-expression… the camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible to the eye and yet, the photographer who wields it well can depict what lies unseen in his memory.”
- Eikoh Hosoe












READ MORE >>>



SHOMEI TOMATSU-THE MOST INFLUENTIAL JAPANESE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE POSTWAR ERA

Shomei Tomatsu (1930-2012) was the face of postwar photography. His series Nagasaki and Scars can be seen in major museums across the world. 

Shomei Tomatsu, who has died aged 82, was  the most influential Japanese photographer of the postwar era. His raw, grainy and impressionistic style signalled a dramatic break with the quiet formalism that defined earlier Japanese photography, and it influenced many younger photographers, including his friend Daido Moriyama and the often controversial Nobuyoshi Araki

Evan S Connell fell in love with New Mexico, where he did his flight training


Tomatsu was a self-taught photographer. 

Shomei Tomatsu documented the aftermath of his country’s nuclear tragedy. This master of black-and-white inspired photographers from Daido Moriyama and Yutaka Takanashi to Nobuyoshi Araki. He was a student at the University of Aichi in 1954 when his first photographs appeared in major Japanese magazines. He worked as a photographer for the publishing house Iawanami Shashin Bunko, where he met Nagano Shigeichi. In 1959, with Kiruji Kawada, Akira Sato, Akira Tanno, Ikko Narahara and Eikoh Hosoe, he founded the Japanese photo agency Photo Vivo. The same year, he began photographing the 

American bases scattered across the Japanese archipelago. He received a commission for a book on the bomb that ended the war, a project he undertook with Domon Ken. In the 1960s, he documented the student protests in Japan along with the new bohemian movement forming in Shinjuku, Tokyo.


The surreal and unsettling power of the melted bottle image evoked the almost unimaginable horror of the moment and led him into a place beyond reportage or documentary. Later, the American photographer and writer Leo Rubinfien described Tomatsu's Nagasaki images as "sad, haggard facts" and noted that "beneath the surface there was a grief so great that any overt expression of sympathy would have been an insult"


“Bottle Melted and Deformed by Atomic Bomb Heat, Radiation, and Fire, Nagasaki” (1961)


                                                               “Prostitute” (1957)


READ MORE >>>



John Walker’s Strand: Under the Dark Cloth is a documentary that is “beautifully crafted, thoroughly researched and intimately recounted” (Variety) with generous amounts of Strand’s most famous photographs, clips from his films and collaborators including Fred Zinnemann, Cesare Zavattini and Georgia O’Keeffe. This is a valuable introduction to the life and work of Paul Strand suitable for both art historians and general viewers alike.
Born in New York City to Bohemian parents, Strand was a student of renowned documentary photographer Lewis Hine at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School in his late teens. It was while on a field trip in this class that Strand first visited the 291 art gallery – operated by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen – where exhibitions of work by forward-thinking Modernist photographers and painters would convince Strand to take his photographic hobby more seriously. Stieglitz would later promote Strand’s work both in the 291 itself and in his photography publication Camera Work. Strand’s earlier work displayed him experimenting with formal abstractions, while other works showed his interest in using the camera as a tool for social reform (no doubt influenced by Hine).

READ MORE >>>

EDWARD CURTIS PHOTOGRAPHY


BEGINNING IN 1901 AT THE AGE OF 33, EDWARD S. CURTIS
A SEATTLE PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER, SPENT 30 YEARS DOCUMENTING NATIVE NORTH AMERICAN PEOPLES.




COMMISSIONED BY JP MORGAN HE PLANNED TO CAPTURE
AND DOCUMENT WHAT HE THOUGHT WAS “THE VANISHING INDIAN”. GUIDED BY THIS CONCEPT, CURTIS TOOK OVER 40,000 IMAGES FROM OVER 80 TRIBES AND MADE 10,000 WAX CYLINDER RECORDINGS OF INDIAN LANGUAGES AND MUSIC. HIS ETHNOGRAPHIES RECORDED TRIBAL HISTORIES AS WELL AS DESCRIBED CEREMONIES, TRIBAL POPULATION AND CUSTOMS, FOODS, CLOTHING AND GAMES. IN 1930 THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN WAS PUBLISHED COMPRISING TWENTY VOLUMES OF WRITING AND MORE THAN 2,200 SEPIA TONED PHOTOGRAPHS. AFTER INVESTING DECADES OF HIS LIFE AND HIS FINANCES IN THE PROJECT, LESS THAN 300 COPIES WERE SOLD. CURTIS WAS LEFT BANKRUPT AND DIVORCED AND PASSED AWAY ON OCT 19, 1952—HIS WORK VIRTUALLY UNKNOWN.













READ MORE >>>

SIXTY-FIVE YEARS OF REVOLUTION BY MAGNUM


New Yorker


As we near the end of another year marked by the revolutions that continue to roil the Middle East, punctuated at this year-end with the recent conflagration in Gaza, Magnum has published “Magnum Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom,” a collection of some of the most powerful photographs of the convulsions of conflict by the agency’s renowned photographers.

Revolution0001.jpgMagnum, the co-op agency founded in 1947 by four photojournalists who had all experienced the Second World War—Robert CapaHenri Cartier-BressonGeorge Rodger, and David (Chim) Seymour—has secured its esteemed place in the photographic world. “Over the past sixty-five years, as new photographers have joined Magnum and others have died or retired,” writes Jon Lee Anderson in the book’s introduction, “its members have continued to document a world in conflict.”

“As chronicled by them,” he continues, “this book is about a time of revolution, beginning with the present-day Twitter-age revolutions that began to convulse the Arab world in 2011, and ending at the height of the Cold War with the Hungarian uprising of 1956. It is a stunning reminder of how much the world has been transformed within the span of a human lifetime, and also how little.”

Tunis, Tunisia, October, 2011. Two women look out from the window of a city train as it passes through downtown. Photograph by Moises Saman.

Revolution0002.jpg 

Cairo, Egypt, 2011. Anti-Mubarak demonstrations in Tahrir square. Photograph by Alex Majoli.


READ MORE >>>


FROM AMERICAN SUBURBS X

http://www.americansuburbx.com/ 


Larry Clark teenage21 INTERVIEW: Larry Clark (2007)

 INTERVIEW: “Larry Clark” (2007)>>>

By Raphaël Cuir, originally published in Art Press, August 2007
A year ago, seven short films by Marina Abramovic, Matthew Barney, Gaspar Noé, Richard Prince, Marco Brambilla, Sam Taylor-Wood and Larry Clark were shown at Cannes under the title Destricted. The idea of producers Mel Agace and Neville Wakefield was to deal “explicitly” with sexuality, and so blur the boundaries between art and pornography. The films go on general release in France this spring (April 25) and a DVD is due in October. Here was a perfect reason for making an old dream come true and meeting up with Larry Clark, whose short is definitely the most graphic of the seven.(1)

READ MORE >>>



WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed 


Conflict and Its Aftermath

In November, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will unveil an exhibition on war photography unprecedented in scale and ambition. The origins of “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” can be traced back to the museum’s acquisition—ten years ago—of the first known print of Joe Rosenthal’s famous photograph of the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima. 


http://www.mfah.org/news/pressrelease/warphotography-photographs-armed-conflict-and-its-aftermath/




READ MORE >>>



SOME ICONIC PHOTOS FROM THE VIETNAM WAR


Vietnam 35th Anniversa(13)A























SOUTH VIETNAMESE GEN. NGUYEN NGOC LOAN, CHIEF OF THE NATIONAL POLICE, FIRES HIS PISTOL INTO THE HEAD OF SUSPECTED VIET CONG OFFICER NGUYEN VAN LEM, ALSO KNOWN AS BAY LOP, ON A SAIGON STREET, EARLY IN THE TET OFFENSIVE. FEB. 1, 1968 (AP PHOTO/EDDIE ADAMS, FILE)
Vietnam 35th Anniversa(5)A
A SOUTH VIETNAMESE WOMAN MOURNS OVER THE BODY OF HER HUSBAND, FOUND WITH 47 OTHERS IN A MASS GRAVE NEAR HUE, VIETNAM. APRIL 1969 (AP PHOTO/HORST FAAS, FILE)
Vietnam 35th Anniversa(9)A
NINE YEAR OLD KIM PHUC RUNS DOWN ROUTE 1 NEAR TRANG BANG, VIETNAM AFTER AN AERIAL NAPALM ATTACK. JUNE 8, 1972  (AP PHOTO/NICK UT, FILE)
Vietnam 35th AnniversaryA
U.S. NAVY PERSONNEL ABOARD THE USS BLUE RIDGE PUSH A HELICOPTER INTO THE SEA OFF THE COAST OF VIETNAM IN ORDER TO MAKE ROOM FOR MORE EVACUATION FLIGHTS FROM SAIGON. APRIL 29, 1975 (AP PHOTO/FILE)

MORE >>>


PAOLO PELLEGRIN : UNFINISHED PHOTOGRAPHY



The Magnum photojournalist Paolo Pellegrin has documented many of this generation’s major conflicts and disasters, from wars to revolutions to tsunamis.

"I'm more interested in a photography that is 'unfinished' - a photography that is suggestive and can trigger a conversation or dialogue. There are pictures that are closed, finished, to which there is no way in.


A dog is seen in the flooded streets of Banda Aceh, in the aftermath of a devastating tsunami wave that hit the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, 2005


---> PAOLO PELLEGRIN - MAGNUM PHOTOS PHOTOGRAPHER PORTFOLIO

Elliott Erwitt Photography

Elliott Erwitt is an advertising and documentary photographer known for his black and white candid shots of ironic and absurd situations within everyday settings— a master of Henri Cartier-Bresson's "decisive moment"




Elliott Erwitt, Paris, 1989 Tour Eiffel
Elliott Erwitt, Paris, 1989 Tour Eiffel
\Elliott Erwitt, California 1955
Elliott Erwitt, California 1955

MORE >>>



PHOTOGRAPHY OF BERT HARDY


Bert Hardy (1913 – 1995)
Hardy was a British documentary and press photographer. He rose from humble working class origins to work first for the General Photographic Agency, then to found his own freelance firm Criterion. In 1941 Criterion was absorbed into the leading picture publication of the 1930s and 1940s, Picture Post. Hardy was self-taught and used a Leica – unconventional for press photographers at that time – but went on to become the Post’s Chief Photographer.
Hardy served as a war photographer in the Royal Army Photographic Unit from 1942 until 1946: he took part in the D-Day landings in June 1944; covered the liberation of Paris; the allied advance across the Rhine; and was one of the first photographers to enter a liberated Nazi concentration camp to record the suffering there. He later went on the cover the Korean War for Picture Post, reporting on United Nations atrocities at Pusan in 1950.
Having writing an article for amateur photographers suggesting you didn’t need an expensive camera to take good pictures Hardy staged a carefully posed photograph of two young women sitting on railings above a breezy Blackpool promenade using a Box Brownie. After leaving Picture Post Hardy became one of the most successful advertising photographers of the 1960s.
 "It never seemed like work," said Bert Hardy. "Photography was always good fun." 






READ MORE >>>


Apartheid uncovered: Steve Bloom

In the mid 1970s, Steve Bloom took to the streets and townships to photograph people at a critical moment in the history of apartheid-era South Africa, when the first real cracks appeared. Beneath the Surface, part of the London festival of photography, is at Guardian Gallery, Kings Place, London, from 1 June until 28 June 2012

  Afrikaans couple outside church, Paarl, 1976


Bergie, Cape Town 1976
Homeless people were known as ‘bergies’. The word is derived from the Afrikaans word ‘mountain’, because they originally found shelter on the slopes of Table Mountain. Many were addicted to methylated spirit



READ MORE >>>



Detroit: 138 Square Miles

Dubbed 'Motor City', Detroit is the birthplace of the US car industry.
Iconic auto companies like General Motors, Ford and Chrysler brought jobs and prosperity the Michigan city that was once America's fourth largest with nearly two million inhabitants.
As those companies faced competition from auto manufacturers in Japan, Detroit endured a population exodus.
Detroit now boasts only about 700,000 residents, down 25% from 10 years ago.
After an $80 billion (£51.5 billion) US government car industry bailout, Detroit is attempting to resurrect itself.
But the abandoned homes and ballrooms, ruined factories and an empty, cavernous train station serve as daily reminders of the city's more affluent past.

For her book, Detroit: 138 Square Miles, photographer Julia Reyes Taubman spent seven years documenting what is left of Detroit. She argues its ruins are monuments to American innovation that must be preserved.

--->WATCH VIDEO ON BBC

--->VISIT HTTP://DETROIT138SQUAREMILES.COM/







READ MORE >>>


Historical Photography-15 of the most important



1. The First Photograph [France, 1826]

800Px-View From The Window At Le Gras, Joseph Nice?phore Nie?pce


Taken by Nicéphore Niépce, this is the first photograph ever taken which still exists. He called his method heliography (sun writing) and this photograph took 8 hours of exposure time (hence sunlight on both sides of the building).


14. Phan Thị Kim Phúc [Vietnam, 1972]

Century0256


The girl in the centre of this photograph is 9 year olf Kim Phúc. She is running from a napalm attack which caused serious burns on her back. The boy is her older brother. Both survived. This photo (by Huynh Cong Ut) became one of the most published of the Vietnam war.

READ MORE >>>


Horst Faas Photography



As chief of photo operations for The Associated Press in Saigon for a decade beginning in 1962, Horst Faas didn't just cover the fighting - he also recruited and trained new talent from among foreign and Vietnamese freelancers.

The result was "Horst's army" of young photographers, who fanned out with Faas-supplied cameras and film and stern orders to "come back with good pictures."


Read more here: http://www.centredaily.com/2012/05/10/3192463/horst-faas-ap-combat-photographer.html#storylink=cpy




READ MORE >>>




Kevin Cater Carter 

 Kevin Carter (13 September 1960 in Johannesburg – 27 July 1994) was an award-winning South Africanphotojournalist and member of the Bang-Bang Club.
Kevin Carter was born in apartheid South Africa and grew up in a middle-class, whites-only neighborhood. As a child, he occasionally saw police raids to arrest blacks who were illegally living in the area. He said later that he questioned how his parents, a Catholic, "liberal" family, could be what he described as 'lackadaisical' about fighting against apartheid. 


In March 1993, while on a trip to Sudan, Carter was preparing to photograph a starving toddler trying to reach a feeding center when a vulture landed nearby. Carter reported to have taken the picture, because it was his "job title", and leaving. He came under criticism for failing to help the girl:
The St. Petersburg Times in Florida said this of Carter: "The man adjusting his lens to take just the right frame of her suffering, might just as well be a predator, another vulture on the scene."
Sold to the New York Times, the photograph first appeared on March 26, 1993. Hundreds of people contacted the newspaper to ask the fate of the girl. The paper reported that it was unknown whether she had managed to reach the feeding center. In 1994, the photograph won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography.



READ MORE >>>




 LA Revolution Collection

MARTIN PARR’S ‘PROTEST BOX’ PUTS THINGS INTO PERSPECTIVE
By Martin Par 

This photo is taken from Paolo Gasparini’s masterpiece Para Verte Mejor, América Latina



READ MORE >>>



SHOT BY KERN 
Richard Kern, photographer and filmmaker remains, first and foremost, a portraitist.   For more than two decades Kern has sought to unravel and illuminate the complex and often darker sides of human nature.

Kern makes the psychological space between the sitter, photographer and audience his subject. With his dry, matter of fact approach, he underlines the absurdity of truth and objectivity in photography while playing with our reliance upon taxonomies around sexual representation. 

Kern’s images have been widely published in Purple, Vice, V Magazine and Italian GQ as well as in his numerous books and exhibited at The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum and in more than 30 solo shows around the world.

Kern lives and works in New York City.

Shot by Kern is a web series which follows artist Richard Kern as he photographs girls  in different cities across Europe , Canada and America in collaborations with Vice magazine.

READ MORE >>>