My favorite film: The Big Lebowski (1998)

Probably it's not  the best film by the Coen brothers (Fargo in my opinion is the best one--"Well, that's just like, your opinion man" Dude would say) , but I do not know how many times I have seen this  film with absolutely unbelievable list of characters ,regardless each and every time makes me laugh to the tears  –  I've never watched anything that I love as much as The Big Lebowski.
 Jeff Bridges is The Dude, although his real name is Lebowski, which also happens to be the name of a local millionaire, whose wife gets kidnapped, which results in the Dude being indicted into a bluff which may or may not involve German nihilists. The surrounding cast put in fantastic performances, such is the Coen brothers' ability to condense the essence of an actor's unique qualities into a role they were seemingly born to play. Maude Lebowski is a glacial, maniacal artist superbly played by Julianne Moore. 


Of all the Coen brothers performances John Goodman has given us, his turn as the frustrated and frustrating Walter Sobchak, a Vietnam veteran who carries his ex-wife's Pomeranian around while telling Donny Kerabatsos (Steve Buscemi) to shut it, is arguably his best. The backdrop to this is a tense local bowling championship in which The Dude is being threatened by a paedophile called Jesus (John Turturro).

The Big Lebowski is stone cold hilarious. The aggressive 
 Tuturro as Jesus, all in purple and promising to "Well, that's just like, your opinion", "I need my fu**** "Johnson"  .... until the ending/ashes scene.

"The Big Lebowski" is about an attitude, not a story. It's easy to miss that, because the story is so urgently pursued. It involves kidnapping, ransom money, a porno king, a reclusive millionaire, a runaway girl, the Malibu police, a woman who paints while nude and strapped to an overhead harness, and the last act of the disagreement between Vietnam veterans and Flower Power. It has more scenes about bowling than anything else.

Roger Ebert

Description

Since its original release, The Big Lebowski has become a cult classic. Steve Palopoli wrote about the film's emerging cult status in July 2002. He first realized that the film had acult following when he attended a midnight screening in 2000 at the New Beverly Cinema in Los Angeles and witnessed people quoting dialogue from the film to each other. Soon after the article appeared, the programmer for a local midnight film series in Santa Cruz decided to screen The Big Lebowski, and on the first weekend they had to turn away several hundred people. The theater held the film over for six weeks, which had never happened before.
An annual festival, the Lebowski Fest, began in Louisville, Kentucky, United States in 2002 with 150 fans showing up, and has since expanded to several other cities. The Festival's main event each year is a night of unlimited bowling with various contests including costume, trivia, hardest- and farthest-traveled contests. Held over a weekend, events typically include a pre-fest party with bands the night before the bowling event as well as a day-long outdoor party with bands, vendor booths and games. Various celebrities from the film have even attended some of the events, including Jeff Bridges who attended the Los Angeles event. The British equivalent, inspired by Lebowski Fest, is known as The Dude Abides and is held in London.

Dudeism, an online religion devoted largely to spreading the philosophy and lifestyle of the movie's main character was founded in 2005. Also known as The Church of the Latter-Day Dude, the organization has ordained over 130,000 "Dudeist Priests" all over the world via its website.

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And I adore the Dude. Man, the Dude, that’s me! You can even call me El Duderino.” I’m a great admirer of Timberlake as an actor; the underlying import of an identification with Jeff Bridges’s accidental hero—or, rather, a hero before his time—and its connection with the new film are the subject of this clip.